WebbMason Debuts on Tampa Bay Business Journal List of 25 Largest Commercial Printers

December 9, 2013


By Mark Smith, Vice President of Sales, Florida

As the executive in charge of sales and operations in Florida, I am thrilled that WebbMason recently debuted on the Tampa Bay Business Journal List of 25 Largest Commercial Printers in the Tampa area. More than 90 companies were surveyed for the annual feature that ranks commercial printers by number of full-time employees working in Tampa area offices. Ranking among the top 25 employers in the Tampa commercial printing community is an important milestone and honor for WebbMason. Attracting and retaining clients requires a talented team that represents our company well, from sales through delivery and every step in between. Making this list is a validation of WebbMason’s values and value.Tampa Bay Business Journal

WebbMason has experienced steady growth since opening our Largo office in 2006. We have expanded our presence to include a 10,000 sq. ft. climate controlled distribution center where we offer warehousing and kitting and assembly services. We count among our clients some of the most best known companies in the Tampa area. These include Bloomin’ Brands, one of the world’s largest casual dining companies and whose portfolio of companies include Outback Steakhouse, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, and Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar; PODS Enterprises, Inc., which revolutionized the moving and storage business with its self-service container service; financial services giant, Raymond James; and, World of Beer, an operator of 50 beer-centric taverns in 14 states. If you believe, as I do, that you are known by the company you keep, I’d say WebbMason has established itself as an integral part of the local business community.

WebbMason’s broad range of services is a major differentiator and a primary reason for the company’s success. The scope and quality of our offerings is why more than 1,200 clients in healthcare, hospitality, financial services, manufacturing, technology and other major industries have selected us for printing and a full range of multichannel offline and digital marketing services, including copywriting, graphic design, brand identity, web design and development, search engine marketing/search engine optimization, email marketing, social media management, promotional items, and tradeshow provisioning and support.

Clients choose and stay with us in no small part because of our dedicated, skilled people. WebbMason looks forward to continued business growth in Tampa and throughout Florida.

 

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Why Does My Logo Look Different? 3 Things to Help Digital Marketers Find Their True Colors

October 30, 2013

By Eric King, VP Operations, WebbMason Commercial

With apologies to quirky 80s pop queen, Cindy Lauper, the “true colors” used to support or even define a brand might not translate into various media – print, digital, billboards, three-dimensional items – the way they were intended. This is problematic. To understand the importance color plays in shaping the identity of a brand, try this quick test. Ask the next group of women you see what company’s products are packaged in “little blue boxes”, or ask just about any guy in the Plains states who makes the big green tractors. You are very likely to get the answers Tiffany and John Deere without much thought (and usually accompanied by a smile).

According to design website Color Matters (www.colormatters.com), “80 percent of visual information that we take in is related to color” and that is perhaps why the connections between emotion, color and brand are so intrinsically linked.

The availability of cheap and easy digital printing has made many digital-native marketers unaware of the basics of color management for printed items. Below are three things every marketer should understand to significantly improve the color consistency of their printed projects.

1)      Color Management (What is the Pantone Matching System?)

Printing Color swatches

The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is an internationally recognized system for specifying colors. By assigning a numerical value to each unique hue, marketers and printers can maintain consistency across different media, printing processes, and even geographies. Most seasoned marketers can tell you their brands’ PMS color off the top of their head as it becomes a very important element for maintaining brand integrity.

 2)      Spot Color vs. Process Color: What’s the Difference?


To professional printers, all colors of a printed piece are defined as either “process” or “spot.” Each is created in a different manner and each can produce different results.

  • Process color uses half-screen dots of colors to create the illusion of solid colors to the human eye. Often called 4 Color (4/c) printing, Process color screens a specific percentage of each of the four color inks – cyan, magenta, yellow and black, (usually abbreviated “CMYK”) onto a surface.
  • Spot Color is produced by pre-mixing ink pigments, in appropriate quantities. Think about mixing yellow and blue paint to get green in grade school. Spot color is created in a similar, although much more precise, manner. Once mixed, the finished spot colors are then applied to your project.

3)      Coated, Uncoated and Matte Finishes


The texture of the media you are printing on can affect the way ink is absorbed, and subsequently, appears to the eye. By adding a suffix letter to PMS colors, you can determine how it will look on a certain media. Those letters are C (coated), U (uncoated) and M (matte).

WebbMason has helped simplify the process of maintaining brand and color consistency across all platforms with the introduction of MarketingBench 2.0, the marketing automation platform for digital and traditional channel management. You can learn more about how MarketingBench can help you produce more effective and more efficient results here.


DocBuilder Tips & Tricks: Saving Savvy

June 4, 2012

Sara’s Tips and Tricks for WebbMason DocBuilder, final entry.

This tip is for working with PowerPoint presentations before you send them to WM DocBuilder to be printed. If you need presentation handouts and want to be environmentally-friendly, a great way to do that is to print to print 2, 3, 4 or even 6 slides together on a single page — instead of printing each slide as a full page. You can do this easily by changing your print setting. Depending on your version of Microsoft Office, the steps may vary slightly. With your file open, go to the print screen. Change your print settings to the desired number of slides per page. The next step is important. Choose a printer that will print the file as a PDF or use a PowerPoint plug-in that automatically writes the file as a PDF with your print settings applied. If you simply try to save your file as a PDF with these settings, it will revert back to the full-page version.

I hope you find the information I’ve shared useful.  If you have any questions related to WebbMason DocBuilder, I’m here to help!  Please email them to DocBuilder@webbmason.com

Sara E. Post
Product Marketing Manager


DocBuilder Tips & Tricks Series: Keeping it Clear

May 7, 2012

Sara’s Tips and Tricks for WebbMason DocBuilder, first of five entries.

Everyone agrees WebbMason DocBuilder is one of the coolest new features of MarketingBench™!  Having an on-demand document printing technology at your fingertips saves an expensive trip to the copy shop and keeps you from having to slave over a machine printing handouts for your big presentation.  Even better, WebbMason DocBuilder is saving users like you 30-40% in cost and resources!

Even though WebbMason DocBuilder is super-easy to use, I wanted to share some helpful tips and tricks to enhance your experience.

Some people refer to this as deleting temporary internet files.  Sometimes your browser gets bogged down, and nobody likes that.  To maximize WM DocBuilder’s speed and performance, you should clear your cache frequently.  For an explanation and instructions on how to clear your cache click here.

I hope you find the information I’ve shared useful.  If you have can questions related to WebbMason DocBuilder, I’m here to help!  Please email them to DocBuilder@webbmason.com

Sara E. Post
Product Marketing Manager


View from the Inside: docBuilder Marketer Talks about Her First Product Rollout Experience

August 23, 2011

I consider myself a marketing professional. At WebbMason, I collaborate with a team of talented individuals to promote products/services and support a national sales team. I face the same challenges as any other marketing professional – maintaining the integrity of a brand, meeting budget goals, responding to the needs of very talented and slightly demanding sales people (I’m allowed to say that, I used to be one) – and the overall need to do more with less. There’s less time to be proactive, more pressure to improve ROI, fewer resources at my disposal, and higher expectations for greater results.

But I have to admit, I love it!

In early 2011, I accepted the role of Product Marketing Manager with WebbMason, after six years with the company. Since then my energy has been focused on launching the newest feature of WebbMason’s MarketingBench platform, a web-to-print application, later named “docBuilder”. In May, docBuilder entered its “beta” phase, which in essence meant that our development team felt that it was ready to be taken for a spin, and that I and a select group of customers were allowed to test-drive it. In terms of performance, it handled well, but we had to take a look under the hood from time to time and make adjustments. The feedback from the beta customers was extremely helpful in identifying areas for improvement and applications for use. By July we had an on-demand document printing technology that we could take to market.

It has been an incredible experience to champion a product, begin to see it take shape, have it be embraced by our sales team for its potential and eventually adopted by our customers for its value. Our first product rollout was to The College Board, an organization that helps to prepare and connect students to higher education. Fiona Yung, assistant director, stated, “From my first experience with docBuilder, I recognized its value. With the easy-to-use interface, I was able to build my documents… in a virtual environment.” What does she mean “build” a document, you ask?

I will spare you the sales pitch, but in a nutshell, docBuilder gives the marketing professional like myself the ability to create, print and distribute professional documents – sales proposals, account reviews, marketing collateral, the dreaded RFP (think the stuff you have to run to-and-from the expensive retail copy shop in the rain for) – on-the-fly, without ever leaving one’s desk. Best of all, it saves my colleagues and I lots of time and precious budget dollars. If you would like to learn more about how WebbMason docBuilder is giving organizations a head start with an all-in-one solution for controlling the cost and quality of their outsourced printing, visit http://wmdocbuilder.com/pr.

For a demonstration of its capabilities, check out the video below:

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Founded in 1989, WebbMason is one of the fastest-growing print and brand management service companies in the United States, helping marketing departments and their internal and external partners save money and streamline processes through a winning combination of industry expertise, exceptional print supply chain partners and technological innovation. Headquartered in Hunt Valley, Maryland, WebbMason has 20 sales offices throughout the United States.


Internet Tracking (Again): What’s the Big Deal?

July 29, 2011

When we last wrote about Internet Tracking about 5 weeks ago, we figured it would be our last word on the subject. Legislation was being passed to require online data-farmers to provide clear “opt-out” options, consumer awareness was growing, and things seemed to be improving.

Since then, absolutely nothing has changed. Actually, that isn’t really true, they have gotten worse.

News sites continue to write sensationalist stories suggesting that internet marketers are waiting like ravenous dogs for every scrap of information you leave online. Buzz words like “Threat,” “Invasive,” and “No Privacy,” crop up over and over again. People are desperate to find any way they can to surf the internet anonymously, leaving behind no trace of their habits. We think it is time to be a little more realistic.

1. What is Internet Tracking Really Doing to Harm You?

When you click onto a site – any site – you leave behind a cookie, which is simply a piece of data equivalent to scratching your name on the wall of a building. Companies that make money off of data like this are only interested in one thing: what do you click on, and why? Trackers want to follow you from one site to the next, trying to find a pattern in your browsing. That information helps them build and sell models for better online advertising; essentially they want to find a way to make their clients’ products more interesting to you.

In general, people using cookies aren’t hunting for your specific home address, phone number or daughter’s Facebook profile. They just want to know where you are shopping, and what got you there. Have you ever taken a survey where you told a store or website how you found out about them? It’s quite literally the exact same information. True, these companies are not asking for your permission, so you could argue that this is an invasion of privacy, but surely there is some exaggeration going on. If a marketer were sitting outside of a public mall, making note of which stores people went into, would you file a lawsuit against them?

2. By Going Online, You May Soon Waive the Freedom to Privacy.

On July 28th, the House Judiciary Committee approved legislation requiring all Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) to track and store data of every single thing you do online for at least one year. Any word you type, link you click, image or video that passes over your monitor will be tracked, saved, and analyzed by your ISP. Honestly, the vote wasn’t even close, with 19 out of 29 representatives in favor of the bill. In truth though, even without this bill, ISP’s still monitor data usage and addresses frequently visited by users.

Internet trackers and internet users are both trying to accomplish the same thing. Trackers want to make advertising that is less irritation and more inviting, and users want to easily find things they are interested in and want to buy. We can’t see a loser anywhere in this equation.

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Founded in 1989, WebbMason is one of the fastest-growing print and brand management service companies in the United States, helping marketing departments and their internal and external partners save money and streamline processes through a winning combination of industry expertise, exceptional print supply chain partners and technological innovation. Headquartered in Hunt Valley, Maryland, WebbMason has 20 sales offices throughout the United States.


Are We In a Direct Mail Renaissance?

July 22, 2011

With all of the attention paid to social media, mobile technology, and advancing tech integration, it is easy to forget the power and success of a simple direct mail campaign. That isn’t to say that print numbers have dropped – they have been rising slightly thanks to efforts by the USPS to simplify and internalize the process – but they have become something of an invisible entity.

For many marketers, direct mail is simply another step to be ticked off on their strategy checklist. Consumers, meanwhile, are still skilled in the art of blindly tossing out those half-hearted attempts at mail advertising. Now, a few enterprising companies are making an effort to return to the kind of eye-catching direct mail pieces that can turn a faltering campaign around.

This blog, describing the Birthday-like joy of an unexpected package from Hendrick’s Gin, is a testament to the power of tactile response. For many consumers, physical objects contain a level of sentimentalism that no electronic mailing list can ever reach. Something as cheap and easy to produce as a notepad can endear a customer to your company for life. Most of us hate junk mail, but everyone likes presents.

But, what about younger generations?

It is easy to dismiss the youth of our culture as tech-obsessed kids who will scarcely recognize a stamp in ten years, but that is perhaps an unfair judgment. A new online service, Snail Mail My Email, has been widely popular with everyone from teens to boomers. In fact, the free, volunteer-run service has had to stop taking orders due to a massive response. Snail Mail will take any email, and handwrite it on nice stationary, before putting it in a custom envelope and dropping it in the mail box. Of course, there is a bit of a tongue-in-cheek sense of antiquity to the whole thing, but still, the service shows that paper letters will never go out of style.

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Founded in 1989, WebbMason is one of the fastest-growing print and brand management service companies in the United States, helping marketing departments and their internal and external partners save money and streamline processes through a winning combination of industry expertise, exceptional print supply chain partners and technological innovation. Headquartered in Hunt Valley, Maryland, WebbMason has 20 sales offices throughout the United States.


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